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  • KCUMB Appoints New Dean of College of Biosciences

    White Robert

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (July 31, 2014) – The Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences recently announced the appointment of Robert White, Ph.D., as dean of the College of Biosciences, effective Aug. 1.

    Dr. White joined the University in 2010 and served as professor of molecular biology and medical genetics. In 2012, he was appointed associate dean for KCUMB College of Biosciences. Prior to that, he was the director of the Mouse Genetics Research Laboratory at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo.

    Dr. White studied biology at the University of Massachusetts at Boston and earned his master of science and doctoral degrees in biology from Boston College. He trained at The Jackson Laboratory there and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital in Boston.

    He has authored over 80 publications in peer-reviewed journals and is the recipient of several extramural grants, including a sizeable grant from the March of Dimes. In 2004, the March of Dimes awarded Dr. White the Kansas City Science Pioneer Award.

    "With Dr. White's leadership, the University can look forward to the further development and success of our programs within our College of Biosciences," said Bruce D. Dubin, D.O., J.D., executive vice president for academic affairs, provost and dean for the College of Osteopathic Medicine.

    Dr. White assumes the office of dean as Douglas R. Rushing, Ph.D., retires after 42 years of service to the University.

     

    About KCUMB
    Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, founded in 1916, is a fully accredited, private university, with a College of Biosciences and a College of Osteopathic Medicine.  The College of Osteopathic Medicine is the oldest medical school in Kansas City, Mo., and the largest in the state. It is the second-largest provider of physicians within the states of Missouri and Kansas, with 72 percent practicing in a primary care specialty in Missouri and 69 percent in Kansas.  



    Posted: 07/31/2014

    Category: Faculty, Research, General